Richard Campbell makes the case:
Today, by my quick estimate, the parks lining Point Grey Road would cost around $300 million to acquire.

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Currently, these parks are rather isolated and difficult to access.

Point Grey is not very safe to cycle on nor very pleasant to cycle, walk or run along. Certainly not a pleasant or even safe family outing. There is little free parking so people can’t easily drive there either. The noise of the speeding traffic makes the parks less enjoyable to spend time in. People driving and cycling by would likely get harassed and honked at if they tried to slow down to enjoy the view. Certainly, the we are not able to get fully value of this gift from previous generations with Pt Grey as a commuter route.

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While the Sun’s headline screams Vancouver’s Point Grey Road set to become a ‘park for the rich’ with new plan restricting traffic, the reality is anyone rich enough to afford a bike, a pair of shoes or a $2.75 bus fare will be able to enjoy the new Point Grey Road. …
With only 50 or so homes along the Point Grey waterfront, not even most millionaire can buy a piece of the view. With the Point Grey Cornwall Greenway, everyone will be able to enjoy the fantastic $300 million views!
Full post here.

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UPDATE: The report to Council is here.

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Richard Campbell noticed first:

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It tooks years too long, but at last the seawall is now connected from the Convention Centre to Coal Harbour Green.   

Because the new path comes in at a hard angle, west-bound cyclists crossing the ped path at fast speed on a downhill slope will have to pay special attention to distracted pedestrians coming down the stairs and not sure which route to take.  There’s a need for some of that green surface treatment at the crossing.

Backstory here and here.

 

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They’ve started the transformation of the old Eaton’s (Sear’s) block into a Nordstrom’s. (What should we now call this site?)

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I’ll photograph it every so often as the skin is stripped away and Cesar Pelli’s original opaque design is replaced with a more transparent facade by James Cheng:

More renderings here.

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The “latrine” at Pacific Centre was one of the most disliked buildings in Vancouver (though its pure modernism had its defenders).  The backlash led to the requirement at City Hall (under planner Ray Spaxman) that there be minimal blank walls on any new design facing a downtown sidewalk, and a requirement for rain-protecting canopies above.

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When we last left our story – October 24 – City Hall promised:

… the  decommissioning plan indicates that half of the operations will relocate to the new terminal by October 31, and all operations will be off of the City waters by December 31.  Timing for removing the infrastructure … anticipated sometime before Spring 2012.

So how are we doing?

Before:

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This weekend:

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All gone!

As it turns out, the seawall had been finished almost all the way to the convention centre connection (the temporary structures had been built over it all) – except for this one little piece:

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So now it’s just a matter of a few weeks and the connection will be complete, with some subsequent work through the spring.  But as you can see, that’s not discouraging people from already using it:

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I’m pretty sure this took a year longer than necessary – but now, at last, it’s almost there.  Bravo!

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When we last left our story – September 10 – the news was good:

Harbour Air will utilize the new, permanent facility for its ticketing and administrative activities. Decommissioning of the temporary facility will begin immediately.

Two days ago:

No signs of change.

In September, the City said:

By early November, PavCo will begin construction on the seawall connection and Harbour Green Park improvements to fully connect the seawall adjacent to the temporary Harbour Air facility.

Let’s find out.

 

UPDATE:  City Hall reports …

All appears to be on track.  Right now, Harbour Air is fitting out the permanent terminal check in and office facilities, and I just confirmed today that they will cease operations at the temporary land-based facility Oct. 31st, as outlined in the decommissioning plan approved by the Director of Planning.  After that, all land-based operations will be from the new terminal.  Following that, the land based infrastructure will be removed, by November 15th.  PavCo is expected to begin seawall construction shortly after, with that work expected to be done by early spring. 

With respect to activity on the docks at the temporary terminal, the  decommissioning plan indicates that half of the operations will relocate to the new terminal by October 31, and all operations will be off of the City waters by December 31.  Timing for removing the infrastructure (the temporary terminal docks and buildings) is still uncertain and depends on DFO approval, but it is anticipated sometime before Spring 2012.

You may know that PavCo has given permission for Harbour Air to put a third dock at the permanent terminal, on PavCo’s waterlot, which will become the westernmost dock at the permanent terminal.  This will not go through the City’s permit process, which PavCo has the authority to decide as a senior level of government.

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Harbour Air to move to permanent terminal by end of 2012

VANCOUVER, BC (September 10, 2012):

By the end of 2012, Harbour Air will be flying in and out of the new, permanent Vancouver Harbour Flight Centre (VHFC) in Vancouver’s Convention Center, based on an agreement in principle between Harbour Air, Vancouver Harbour Flight Centre and the BC Pavilion Corporation (PavCo).

A resolution has been reached to relocate Harbour Air’s downtown Vancouver operations.

The Province has approved Harbour Air’s plan to construct an extension to the west side of the VHFC’s docks to better satisfy Harbour Air’s operational requirements. Harbour Air will utilize the new, permanent facility for its ticketing and administrative activities. Decommissioning of the temporary facility will begin immediately.

By early November, PavCo will begin construction on the seawall connection and Harbour Green Park improvements to fully connect the seawall adjacent to the temporary Harbour Air facility.

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