Photos from the more urban end of the spectrum, taken from 49 winners (from among 12,000) submitted to National Geographic.

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“A balmy 41 degree day and ominous storm clouds promised a little more excitement than normal at Perth’s Australia Day celebrations. The crowd was more impressed with the lightning than the million dollar fireworks and this photo shows why. In the battle for awe inspiring sky shows…. nature wins, hands down.”

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Photos from the more urban end of the spectrum, taken from 49 winners (from among 12,000) submitted to National Geographic.

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The first place winner was Butterfly: Sense of Place Winner. “This image was shot in the Kyrgyz lands of the Wakhan Corridor. The intimacy of this everyday life moment, shot inside of a family yurt, is in total contrast with the harsh environment these nomadic tribes live in.

On the right we notice a television and a sound console. These tribes live weeks away from any village by foot. In spite of being located at an altitude of 4,300 meters in one of the most remote areas of Afghanistan they are equipped with solar panels, satellite dishes and cellphones. Ancestral ways of living, with touches of modernity.” Location: Wakhan Corridor Afghanistan.

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Photos from the more urban end of the spectrum, taken from 49 winners (from among 12,000) submitted to National Geographic.

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Burj Khalifa: Sense of Place. “At 829.84m (2,723 ft), the Burj Khalifa is the tallest building in the world. However, plans are underway to construct an even higher building in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. If completed, that structure will be the first in the world to surpass the 1km (3,280ft) mark.”

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Photos from the more urban end of the spectrum, taken from 49 winners (from among 12,000) submitted to National Geographic.

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The Buzludzha Monument on a 1,441-meter-high peak was built by the Bulgarian communist regime to commemorate events in 1891 when the socialists led by Dimitar Blagoev assembled secretly in the area to form an organized socialist movement. It was opened in 1981. No longer maintained by the Bulgarian government, it has fallen into disuse.

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