Governance & Politics
June 12, 2018

Three Way Mayoral Race in Delta~The Police Chief, The City Manager, The Seasoned Councillor

South of the Fraser, there hasn’t been a lot of change at Delta City Hall for a few decades. Mayor Lois Jackson first served on Delta Council in 1972, and the 1999 election saw her become the second woman to serve as Mayor.

Mayor Jackson is an affable, intelligent woman who has strong beliefs and has fought hard for her constituency. No matter whether you agree or disagree with Ms. Jackson’s position or politics, she has proudly represented Delta for almost twenty years as mayor, attends myriads of Delta events and, despite her steadfast support for projects upon which we may heap what may be considered withering editorial critique (such as the Massey Bridge), Price Tags editors will sit down for tea with her any time.

Her relinquishment of the Mayor’s chair in Delta promises to open up Delta’s future in myriad ways, as it has become a three-horse race between a popular former Police Department Chief, a just-retired City Manager wanting to step up into electoral politics, and a City Councillor known for her ability to work with others on principled solutions.

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In one of the most genius ideas we’ve seen in a while, the Delta Police Department is using social media to help manage safety and vehicular speed — with the ultimate goal of mitigating crashes — in their municipality.

As reported in the Delta Optimist, the police department is directly asking the public via Twitter where speed enforcement is required.

And the result has been brilliant, with cops at stop signs at busy intersections, at traffic signals in commercial areas enforcing the “no right turn” restriction, and even monitoring marked crosswalks to ensure that drivers are actually yielding to pedestrians.

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In the “you just can’t make this stuff up” department, City of Delta council has authorized a payment of $40,000 for Delta Mayor Lois Jackson and select staff to spend four days in Ottawa, followed by three days at a conference in Quebec City.
They’ll have just missed the National Capital’s Tulip Festival, but they’ll be there to demand, among other things, that the federal government just get on with building the Massey Bridge — Delta tax dollars hard at work.
Never mind that there is no funding in the provincial budget for this ten-lane, overbuilt and over-thought span, which would effectively seal the industrialization of this part of the Fraser River.

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I’ve said this several times, but perhaps it’s too uncomfortable to register.
First Nations peoples may speak of their stewardship of the environment they have occupied for millennia, of their love and responsibility to that land, of their perspective into the future measured in generations, not fiscal quarters.
Or they can do this:

.

.

But not both.

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