Coronavirus
March 30, 2020

Les Miserables of Kent: Laughter in Lockdown

Only two days in isolation, and this moved to me to tears … of laughter and recognition.  Bloody brilliant!

The Marsh household, who live in Faversham, took to singing about things people had been complaining about yesterday amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Dad Dr Ben Marsh, a history lecturer at the University of Kent in Canterbury, told KentOnline his family have been overwhelmed with the more than 400,000 views it has already received … “It pulled on all the experiences people had been complaining about – like not being able to work or play football – and it just seemed to fit really well with the song.”  (Click through here.)

Dr Marsh said his children – Alfie, 13; Thomas, 12; Ella, 10; and Tes, eight – have been in a few school productions but have otherwise had no musical theatre training.

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Vancouver fashion at zero degrees:

Calling on our long-time relationship with outdoor recreation, we know how to dress well when the temperature is on either side of zero.

We accommodate a mild coldness, kind of like our temperament, and perfect for the puffy jackets we wear all winter long for every occasion.

Notice the black-and beige combo on everyone.  With the well proportioned backpacks. And a spot of colour.

 

 

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You’ve seen this before:

It’s a 1975 sketch of “Cities in a Sea of Green” – the phrase that captured the intent of the original Livable Region Plan.  In Burnaby, they took it literally (see more in ‘Cities of the Future‘).

Brentwood is SkyTrain scale, amped up.  The combo of towers tightly clustered around a rapid-transit station, connected to a shopping centre and community services, also strikes me as Asian scale – characteristic of station areas in Singapore and Hong Kong, where the planning and design go back to the housing booms of post-war modernism.  These are the urban environments in which so many of us grew up before coming to Vancouver, and to whom the projects are now marketed.

This is West Pacific.

The towers, in particular, take us to new heights – not to everyone’s taste, but very much part of the Grand Bargain.  (For an analysis and prediction of the impact of Brentwood, here’s what I said back in 2014: “Brentwood growth could help maintain quality of life: Price”

As detailed on David Pereira’s blog, the architecture of Brentwood Town Centre also goes back to 1960s with its initial highrises and mall (and, oh yeah, used car lots).  Today, ‘Amazing Brentwood’ takes the cliche of the moment – stacked and angled glass boxes – to climb the slope to the north of the station and animate the many thousands of square meters.

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