Events
June 13, 2019

A Night on the North Shore: Live Recording of the Price Talks Podcast

Do you live or work on the North Shore? Are you a fan of Price Talks, the podcast? Want to hear — and be part of — a discussion about decisions on housing, transportation, and public spaces in West and North Vancouver?

Join Gord and a panel of local residents and pundits in a public chat, and a live recording of Price Talks:

Wednesday, June 26
Doors @ 6:30pm | Recording @ 7:00pm

North Vancouver District Public Library – Lynn Valley Branch
1277 Lynn Valley Road, North Vancouver

Register here — tickets are free.

After the recording, the conversation will continue next door at Brown’s Social House.

Read more »

Clothing street bins have flown below the radar, have proliferated, and have turned out to be deadly. This  Vancouver Sun editorial  notes that in the last four years five people in this province have died in this containers, seven across the country. Several municipalities including Vancouver have sealed these clothing bins up. University engineering students are working on better designs for the bins. But why do we have the bins in the first place? If we are able to have the clothes picked up by the charities or drop them off at a charity store, is that not a more prudent solution that also allows for better connectedness to the organizations and to their works? Why did we allow the public realm to be peppered with these clothing bins? And who is benefiting from clothing  bin profits?

In Metro Vancouver clothing bins are ubiquitous, in different shapes and colours, but all serving the same function~they are donation bins on public and private property with a mail box lid type for people to deposit of cast-off clothes. It is assumed that somehow the charities hosting the bins pick up the clothes, clean and sort them, and ensure that the needy get access to these  donations, or that they are sold so that the sponsoring organizations can benefit. However the needy still have to pay for the clothes, and the fact that people die in these containers suggest that the people we intend the clothes to go to can’t afford them  or don’t have access to them.

There is a dearth of information on what really happens to those clothes, and those donations become part of a more complex story.

Read more »

Thank you, loyal podcasts listeners, for your eagle ears:

Released yesterday (New Year’s Eve), episode #13 “Grading Vancouver Council, by The Independents” was indeed missing 10 minutes of dialogue.

It’s fixed, so be sure to check it out now.

Not yet a subscriber or casual listener? Here’s a preview of our 2018 year-end episode:

Read more »

Long-time friends of Price Tags, Michael and Dianna have pledged an additional $2,000 in a matching contribution — meaning, they’re challenging PT readers to donate — for the very reason this blog exists:

“Price Tags gives us a digest of the most important urbanist writing and information that would otherwise require us to spend hours searching multiple websites.

It’s important stuff that we can’t get anywhere else, that would take too much time to find on our own every week.

Just the time Price Tags saves us each month is worth at least $100 a year — so we’re challenging readers to make a meaningful donation.”

.

Join Michael & Dianna — support Price Tags All donations up to $12,000 will be matched — learn how it will be used. Read more »