Cycling
August 7, 2018

Vancouver Bike Rack Design Contest — Finalists

Finalists are ready for your vote after the 450 proposed designs are now whittled down to a nifty 6.  Learn more about the process and contest HERE and HERE.

I’m hoping for the best for my favourite (“Guard Bird”), but there are merits in practicality and aesthetics to all of the finalists.

Of 450 submissions, 30 shortlisted designs, and much deliberation, a jury panel has narrowed down the final 6 designs to be prototyped and available for testing!

Visit them and vote at:

Monday, August 13, 3pm to 7pm
Adanac and Vernon Plaza

Tuesday, August 14, 3pm to 7pm
Arbutus Greenway and 10th Ave

Wednesday, August 15, 3pm to 7pm
800 Robson St

Thursday, August 16, 11am to 2pm
Helena Gutteridge Plaza in front of City Hall

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In the City Fix  three researchers from WRI Ross Centre for Sustainable Cities have been examining what cities need to do to adopt TDM (Transport Demand Management) systems. And they have come up with some compelling points.

In 2002, the average London driver spent half their travel time sitting in traffic, and road transport accounted for 95 percent of fine particle pollution in the city center. To combat these problems, Greater London’s first mayor, Ken Livingstone, turned to congestion charging…. Unlike in Stockholm, where prices differ during peak and off-peak hours and tolls charge drivers every time they pass a control point, London drivers face a simple, one-time charge of £11.50 ($15.90) to enter the zone, measuring 13 square miles (21 kilometers).

Since the congestion charge introduction in 2003,  pedestrian space has increased and  car usage has declined. This is due to three factors~ a “centralized institutional structure and strong political will, extensive public communication and consultation, and improved public transport and fare integration.”

With 33 boroughs in London the establishment of Transport for London by Mayor Ken Livingstone established a framework to implement congestion charging. The Mayor framed less congestion as improving “economic competitiveness and livability”.

Public outreach on congestion charges was assisted with a network of people who understood the policy and supported it, and public information was readily available.  “The team initiated an intensive program of advertisements, using TfL’s website, newspapers, public radio and television to educate the public about how it worked and what it would mean for residents and commuters. They addressed questions like, what is the congestion charging, how much is it, and how do you pay.”  They also integrated many of the suggestions from public outreach into the design and roll out of the congestion charges.

Lastly, knowing that “the more you invest in roads, the more congestion you create” Transport for London added 300 new buses on the day the congestion charges began, rolled out the “Oyster” transit cards, and made it easy to pay fares through different applications.  “The strategy was to engage both the supply and demand sides of transport simultaneously.”

Revenue from the congestion charging which is estimated to be approximately 2.5 billion in the first 15 years has been “strictly reinvested in London’s transport improvements, especially for public and non-motorized transport.”

In the first year of implementation of congestion charges private car usage fell by 30 per cent and bus usage increased by 20 per cent.  Low transit fares meant a 40 per cent increase in rush hour passengers entering the congestion charge area by bus. Cycling use increased by 230 per cent since 2000. Crashes involving cyclists decreased, and carbon emissions decreased by 20 per cent.

The benefits to the city are evident. “One estimate suggests the net economic benefits of congestion charging in London’s first year of implementation reached £50 million ($78 million in 2004). 

While services like Uber and delivery vans are new transport challenges, enhanced pedestrian areas and protected bike lanes claim space previously used by cars. London is now considering expanding the congestion charging zone city-wide and expanding electronic tolls to charge motorists on time of day and amount of mileage.

The newly released Mayor’s Transport Strategy  now strives for  an 80 per cent modal split of walkers, cyclists and transport users by 2041. In fifteen years London has demonstrated the effectiveness of congestion charges in achieving a greener, healthier city with a policy understood and embraced by its residents.

The takeaway? The need for Metro Vancouver to be strongly supported by all municipalities in congestion pricing strategies, the necessity for good public outreach, and the ramping up of better and more consistent transit service.  London has shown that their road pricing model works.

 

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To make it easy for people to choose the bicycle as a way to get from “A” to “B”, you start by planning a network; step two is safe and effective infrastructure.

Vancouver’s 10th Avenue corridor spans Victoria Drive in the east to Trafalgar Street in the west, and connects to several north-south bike routes, like busy-busy Ontario, Heather, Cypress and the Arbutus Greenway.

The corridor sees around 500,000 bike trips per year, a good portion of which passes through the hospital precinct between Heather and Oak streets, which now has mostly-completed separated cycling and walking paths.

Here’s a gallery of some of the facility.

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You may have noticed Price Tags was offline for a few hours this past Tuesday night as we ‘migrated’ the website from WordPress.com to a third-party service provider; this will provide us much greater administrative, technical and creative control going forward.

Thanks for your patience as we worked out the kinks throughout the week — we will continue to introduce improvements the Price Tags look, feel and experience as we move into summer.

We also updated our Comments Policy — whether you’re a casual reader or die-hard follower, we value your comments, and hope you’ll continue to feel moved enough by the ideas found here to share your thoughts and feedback.

Please read and abide by these basic guidelines to help us maintain a welcoming and inclusive experience.

Send us your feedback, on any topic, anytime.

With appreciation,
The Price Tags Team

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urbanYVR posted a pic of a project to be built across from Vancouver House:

Pinnacle takes wraps off gateway tower at 601 Beach Crescent:

The design said to be inspired by the poised form of a “strong female figure” — designed to counter the masculine “broad shoulders” of Vancouver House. …

Together, the two towers will form a gateway to downtown Vancouver, although the Pinnacle tower will be 535 ft. (163m), slightly higher than Vancouver House at 493 ft. (150m). …

In 2016, Pinnacle International acquired the site from the City of Vancouver with a successful bid of $20 million, contingent on the delivery of non-market housing along with any tower proposal. …

The Pinnacle tower was designed by JYOM International of Shanghai, China, co-founded by Vancouver native Kandice Emmie Kwok. GBL Architects is the architect of record

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Recently, I participated in a CBC Radio “On The Coast” dialogue with CBC’s Michelle Eliot. Karen Reid Sidhu, Executive Director of the Surrey Crime Prevention Society, joined me in addressing motor vehicle speeds, and the question of why convenience is sometimes viewed as more important than reducing crashes, injury and death on our roads.
There are some organizations promoting the idea that vehicular speed has no impact on safe road use. For example, Sense BC ran a campaign against photo radar in British Columbia, which was implemented on highways in the 1990s to save lives. The program was disbanded, and as we reported in late 2016 deaths and injuries of vulnerable road users have increased in this province over much of the past decade.
Dr. Perry Kendall, recently retired as BC’s Provincial Medical Health Officer, has detailed the 280 annual deaths and injuries from vehicular crashes in his report Where the Rubber Meets the Road.
Meanwhile, Sense BC is running a campaign today odiously entitled, “Speed Kills…Your Pocketbook.”

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You have to admire the good folks in Seattle for their approach to making the argument for safe, separated, protected bike lanes.
Last week, in order to encourage the development of a continuous separated bikeway, volunteers came out to create a “people protected bikeway”. And they did a very good job, as documented on Twitter.

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