Smoke and filtered light.

The haze softens the city with a yellow flush.   It’s just on this side of other-worldly.  It’s another indicator that the early stages of climate change are already consequential, regardless of how they are disregarded, dismissed or denied among the decision-makers.  Philip Dick: “Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn’t go away.”

Summer hazes may go away, but the reason they’re here will not.

 

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Ackery’s Alley is another addition to people places in Vancouver, and is set to launch with a fun party:

  • Thursday August 9
  • 7 – 9 pm
  • Behind (east ) of the Orpheum Theatre (near 675 Smithe St)

It’s another welcome transformation of underutilized city space.  It joins Alley Oop (more HERE), Jim Deva Plaza (HERE), Bute and Robson (more HERE) and the 800 block of Robson Street (more HERE). I’ll bet I’ve missed a few.

Funding for Ackery’s Alley was based in part on a Kickstarter campaign. At last count, 428 people had pledged $ 64,736 to make it happen.

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This past weekend, I decided to take a quick ride over to Jericho from the West End, just to see what was happening with the Folk Festival.

Along the way, I found several long-standing examples of the City of Vancouver’s Park Board indifference to cycling.  (I know the commissioners would disagree, but the lack of action over so many years, regardless of all the plans, consultations and rhetoric, speak otherwise.)

For instance the path pictured above, just to the west of the Aquatic Centre, connecting Beach Avenue with the Seaside Greenway —narrow asphalt and worn grass — is ambiguous, inadequate and unsafe.  If it were under the jurisdiction of the City’s engineering department, it would likely have been rectified by now (it’s been this way for decades).

But it’s Park Board territory — and another example of their attitude: #wedontcare.

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Vancouver continues to repurpose public space for people.

More examples, this time from Davie Street in the city’s West End. One is private, and the others are part of a 3-year pilot study by VIVA Vancouver.

The study will test a number of things, including modular design elements and curbside patios that are away from the building. These measures will test innovative features to support a vibrant patio culture and make better use of public space.

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