From May 2 until October 13  1986  there was an international exposition in Vancouver with the theme “Transportation and Communication: World in Motion~World in Touch”.

World fairs used to be a big thing, enabling people to look at different pavilions and cultures without travelling. Canada has hosted two, with Expo 67 being held in Montreal during Canada’s centennial year. Expo 86 coincided with Vancouver’s centennial year, and it was the last world’s fair held in North America in the 20th century.

The story of how the north shore of False Creek between the Granville and Cambie  Street Bridges was transformed from an industrial working harbour into a fair representing 54 countries and a number of corporations has already been told. So too has the awful reality that  people in Single Room Hotels (SRO’s) were displaced for Expo visitors. Rooming house hotels  were subject to an Innkeeper’s Regulation and not the standard Tenancy Act, meaning that long-term tenants could be evicted on just a week’s notice.

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Such a new-Vancouver type of thing.  Let me count the ways:

  • Craft beer:  Not going away; getting bigger if anything, and working hard to find niches
  • The name:  “Electric Bicycle Brewing” (I can hear those teeth a’gnashing out there)
  • The graphics:  right out of those beloved hippie-dippy days of yore
  • A mural for the street front, and interior décor described as “selfie-friendly”
  • Ramen-infused beer:  nothing like the marriage of food and beverage trends
  • Location:  4th just east of Ontario, growing home to creatives in the tech industries
  • Clustering:  an area now also home to the luscious yummies at purebread (5th and Ontario), among other purveyors of nosh and sip.

With thanks to the Daily Hive.

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Image by Frank Ducote

I had the delight of working with Frank Ducote at the City of Vancouver. Frank is an accomplished and well seasoned city planner/designer with a keen eye and a quick wit, and has been recognized for his excellence in urbanism by the Canadian Institute of Planning as a Fellow of the Institute.

Frank has kindly allowed Price Tags Vancouver to publish his image of Myfanwy MacLeod’s  public art sculptures “The Birds” which have returned to Olympic Village in time for two major conferences on Birds as reported this week in Price Tags. Frank’s work is also featured at the Blood Star Gallery on Pender Island as well as other gallery exhibitions.

Image by Frank Ducote

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Birds are what Vancouver is all about this week, as both the Vancouver International Bird Festival and the 27th International Ornithological Congress flock to the city to talk about, well, birds.

And all this activity comes hot on the heels of the poll conducted by Justin McElroy to establish the unofficial brand ambassador for Vancouver.

It wasn’t Mayor Gregor Robertson (who failed to make it out of the first round), nor adopted son and hockey great Trevor Linden. With thousands of Twitter votes cast, and capturing 81 per cent of them, Canuck the Crow “defeated” Michael J. Fox for the championship.

Should you be unaware, Canuck the Crow is a human-reared crow living on the east side, and making his presence known to the locals, including neighbourhood friends, such as those delivering the mail and local passers-by. He was also implicated in a police investigation for taking a knife away from a crime scene, supposedly because it was shiny and he liked it. Canuck the Crow also has his own twitter account.

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Dianna took a close look at this graphic on a utility box when at the Mt Pleasant Mural Fest:

“Where’s the crow?” she asked.  How could a “Birds of Vancouver” not have a crow (especially when it looks like one may become the popular ambassador of this city, as reported by CBC)?

Then when out cycling, she noticed something else.  “We rode the Arbutus today and I made a discovery. Apparently the scarecrows (for the community gardens) have a strong labor union because they’ve taken off for the summer. Or maybe they were in a dressing room changing their clothes?”

Very suspicious.

 

 

 

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