Cycling
February 22, 2019

Jericho Lands Update

Vancouver’s Jericho Lands are essentially 90 acres of greenfield, located amid some of Canada’s most expensive and most desirable real estate.  [Ocean Views!!]

Here’s your chance to have your say about the evolving plan. Remember, though, Ken Sim and the NPA did not win council — so you won’t get a veto, even if that were possible here, given who owns the land.

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Should be an interesting evening in West Vancouver tonight, as the district holds its long-anticipated community meeting on the matter of the B-line rapid bus service proposed for Marine Drive.

Community Meeting – West Vancouver B-Line Service
West Vancouver Community Centre gymnasium
February 21, 6-9 p.m.

Presentation boards here.

Can’t make the meeting? The deadline to send feedback is one week from today (Feb 28 at 11:59pm) — here’s the link to submit online.

Why might tonight’s meeting be interesting? For all the wrong reasons, of course.

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From Slate:

Unlike every other major North American metro area, the Vancouver region doesn’t allow ride-hailing. That makes Vancouver a unique example of what happens when a thriving North American city politely—this is Canada—passes on the ride-hail bandwagon. The result: Vancouver’s public transit system is adding riders even as usage drops in many other cities. Bike commuting is growing, and car-share services like Car2Go are booming. …

So how have Vancouverites handled the lack of ride-hailing?

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Here is a new word for you~”moquette”. Moquettes refer to the thick-pile fabrics used for carpets and upholstery, and if you have travelled in the Transport for London system you are familiar with the fabrics that often cleverly refer to landmarks and stations along the system.How did people go about designing fabrics for public transit seating, and who started it? Feargus O’Sullivan explores that in this article from CityLab based upon the exhibition at the London Transport Museum, Celebrating Britain’s Transport Textile.The best part of this exhibition is the archive, “a new online resource compiling designs and photographs, as well as recorded interviews with designers instrumental in their creation. The results are a rich and wonderfully nerdy archive that has unearthed some forgotten designs, vividly commemorating an aspect of London’s appearance that has long been both omnipresent and scarcely noticed.” It is fascinating to look at the patterns and textiles, many that appear very contemporary with lots of allegory to intersections and street design. Read more »

Skytrain rapid transit continues to be a much-discussed topic in Metro Vancouver.  HERE’s Nathan Pachal, Langley City Councillor and friend of Price Tags, writing in his South Fraser Blog about the Skytrain to Langley being proposed for Surrey.

With the switch from light rail along King George Boulevard and 104th Avenue in Surrey to SkyTrain from King George Station to Langley City, TransLink has set up a new website about the proposed Surrey Langley SkyTrain Project.

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The NDP’s Sheila Malcolmson has won the January 30, 2019 byelection, and our Province’s slim GreeNDP coalition lives on.

Now, let’s talk transit.

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I have been writing about the importance of making public transit fun and accessible and the dearth of publicly accessible washrooms on the Metro Vancouver transit system. There does seem to be a breakthrough and universally accessible washrooms and (gasp) free internet  are being considered this year. No surprise that in surveys 72 percent of people said that public washrooms would make the transit system better.

But how do you motivate people NOT to use a system at peak hours? Intelligent Health UK has a Beat The Street program that offered incentives for school children who would get off London’s Underground a stop earlier and walk the last distance to school. And as The Telegraph reports  The Tokyo Metro Company will ease peak time overcapacity by giving commuters coupons for a soba noodle bowl  if they  take earlier trains before peak hours for ten days in a row.

And here’s the best part~Tokyo Metro’s noodles are an opt-in deal and require 2,000 people to sign up. If 3,000 people go on earlier trains, Tokyo Metro will add tempura to the coupons available.

How crowded is the Tokyo Metro?

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