Urbanism
September 12, 2018

Jake Supports Price Tags. (Plus Some Other Rag.)

Jake founded Vancouver’s Smallworks to work on the same kinds of issues Price Tags shares with our readers —creating new housing solutions, challenging the status quo, and livening up communities with innovative design.

Jake knows the New York Times will be around for awhile. But Price Tags depends on his — and your — active support to sustain our voice.

Be like Jake — support Price Tags All donations up to $10,000 will be matched (we’re 20% there!) — learn how it will be used. Read more »

From newsletter to blog, Price Tags has provided a balanced and often unique perspective on urbanism. So do our commenters: Price Tags is a forum for civil, spirited dialogue — something increasingly needed in our disruptive times.

To keep hearing those voices and maintain that forum, we’re asking you to make a sincere gesture with a small donation.

For a limited time, all contributions will be matched, to a total of $10,000, thanks our very first donor. Your donation will be effectively doubled — and here’s where the money will go.

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Peter German’s 250-page report “Dirty Money“, delivered to Attorney General David Eby on March 31 and to the people of British Columbia almost three months later, contained more than just a set of 48 recommendations for the response and reforms to the gaming industry.

It also delivered a scathing review of casino operations, oversight and regulation in British Columbia, a sector wallowing in poorly-written legislation, acrimony and denial between various concerned entities, such that “certain Lower Mainland casinos unwittingly served as laundromats for the proceeds of organized crime.”

German describes it as a “collective system failure” of the province’s casinos, where an estimated $100 million of illicitly gained currency transferred from anonymous hand to anonymous hand.

That the money laundering uncovered so far in casinos is but a “drop in the bucket”, according to Mr. German’s interviews, is disturbing enough. But it delivered a third eye-opener — that there are likely other sectors in the provincial economy are being used, mis-used and abused in the same way.

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