Viewpoint
January 11, 2007

Marshmallow Unbound

This just in today from Paul Krueger, a planner at City Hall, who got this shot from the roof at 12th and Cambie.

[For those who don’t get the title reference, locals refer to B.C. Place as “the marshmallow in bondage” – at least when the fabric roof is inflated, unlike at the moment when, due to wind damage and rather like stadium management, it’s very much depressed.]

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ArchNewsNow.com – a daily e-newsletter indispensible for those into architecture – has a nice piece on the American Institute of Architecture’s Top Ten Green Projects Award. As one would hope, Vancouver is well represented – and, indeed, they’ve highlighted two winners from past years:
From 2004, the White Rock Operations Centre by Peter Busby.
And from 2000, the C.K. Choi Building at UBC by Matsuzaki Wright Architects.

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January 10, 2007

More evidence, here in The Independent, that the passivity which characterizes our current attitude to climate change is dissipating fast

 

 

EU: Climate change will transform the face of the continent
Europe, the richest and most fertile continent and the model for the modern world, will be devastated by climate change, the European Union predicts today.
The ecosystems that have underpinned all European societies from Ancient Greece and Rome to present-day Britain and France, and which helped European civilisation gain global pre-eminence, will be disabled by remorselessly rising temperatures, EU scientists forecast in a remarkable report which is as ominous as it is detailed.
Full article here.

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Just in: a response to Price Tags 90 from Brent Belsher. Normally I’d put it in the comments section, but I draw your attention to the link Brent provides at the end to an article on “The Living Room” – a new cinema that is oh so Portland. Check it out.

I loved the Portland profile. I’ve got family there and have been traveling up and down I-5 for years, but what’s been going on over the last few is really quite something. I wish this whole Cascadia thing would become more of a reality. I’d love to see us become more connected with our regional neighbours to the south. Articles like this will only help. I’m going down with a group of friends this spring that have never been there before. Your Price Tag has just created a little more excitement around the trip.

Now if we could just get a gondola up to SFU from the skytrain….

Brent

Did you see this place when you were there? I love the concept:

http://www.portlandtribune.com/features/story.php?story_id=116827761111699300

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This shouldn’t be necessary.  But I’m going to acknowledge that the new federal Environment minister John Baird at least made the connection between the wind storm that devastated Stanley Park and climate change.
“Weird weather … is a ‘wake-up call,’ ” Baird is reported as saying in today’s Sun.  “‘It’s another reason why we have to act on climate change.”
We’ll see if appropriate policy follows, but at least we have a responsible politician making some connections – unlike Gordon Campbell, our provincial Premier, who has managed to be almost totally oblivious on this issue. 
I pursue that theme in my column in the latest issue of Business in Vancouver.

I think we just had a Katrina Moment – a weather event so sudden, so severe, it disturbs not just the landscape but the status quo.
The December 15 windstorm, the third in a week, reinforced the usual fear about the vulnerability of our technological web and added the fear of retribution. Was nature’s wrath a consequence of the progress that has made us fat and happy? Has the climate-change issue turned personal, and moral?
At this point, it is compulsory to note that a single extraordinary event does not an argument make. Even those who believe that the science is clear on climate change will issue that standard disclaimer.
But the burden of proof has shifted. Now it’s the skeptics who are obliged to argue that an event consistent with climate-change theory that projects more extreme weather is not a cause for worry of worse to come. With every Katrina Moment, it becomes tougher to defend indifference.
Most politicians would prefer to avoid addressing global warming and are so far doing an excellent job of it. The B.C. Hansard of 2005 shows a total of two paragraphs devoted to climate change. I asked a selection of people, some of whom are Liberal supporters: “True or false – Gordon Campbell has had nothing to say about climate change.” Without exception: “True.”
It’s understandable. Why take on climate change when the danger is distant, the costs unknown and the global difference we would make almost insignificant? The 3-D strategy of doubt, deny and delay has worked pretty well so far. But the evidence keeps getting worse. With each Katrina Moment, more and more people wonder how our leaders are going to respond to our anxiety. Normally dry debate over “sustainability” is turning emotional.
Marc Jaccard, the author of Sustainable Fossil Fuels and a past chairman of the B.C. Utilities Commission, recently wrote that our provincial politicians will be asked: “What did you do for the atmosphere, Daddy?”
“My bet is,” he concluded, “that B.C.’s cabinet ministers will avoid telling their children about the difference they could have made.”
Jaccard was questioning the province’s decision to allow coal-burning power plants with no carbon capture. To do so, given available technology, is like saying, not only are we ignoring climate change, we don’t believe there will be any unexpected economic consequences over the life of the project.
That’s pretty much the position of Don Potts, the executive director of the Joint Industry Electricity Steering Committee, who represents the major industrial users of purchased electric power in B.C.
“To reject these facilities now,” he argues, “sends a costly message to those in the private sector who may want to help supply the growing need for electric power in B.C.”
That’s an astonishing position, given the likely economic retribution that will occur as other jurisdictions take action.
California is considering prohibiting the state’s investor-owned utilities from buying power from any source that emits more carbon dioxide than does a modern natural-gas power plant.
Says Jaccard: “This will force coal plant developers to move more quickly to coal plants with carbon capture and storage – which will still be cheaper than natural gas plants, nuclear and most renewables.”
In the next few weeks, a new energy strategy will be announced by the province. The premier, who has had nothing of consequence to say so far, will have his chance. A leadership vacuum, like a natural one, does not remain unfilled.
Gordon Price is the director of Simon Fraser University’s city program and a former Vancouver city councillor. His e-mail address is pricetags@shaw.ca. His column appears monthly.

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January 8, 2007

Pat Harrison of JPH Consultants in Nanaimo clearly has a fascination for Google Earth:

“Here are a few images I’ve snagged from Google Earth. Some of the composited sattelite images form really graphic patterns.”

“These are un-editted except that I’ve tweaked the contrast, brightness and saturation a bit to make the mosaics more evident. “




Brilliant!

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Hot off the computer: Price Tags 90.  You can download it here.

Portland, Oregon, and Vancouver, B.C. may be the poster children of good urbanism in their respective countries.  But they also influence each other – and this issue of Price Tags ilustrates how in their newest neighbourhoods.

Also: dramatic views of the North American west under snow.

Got comments?  Add them here.

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The City versus Surburbs debate has been going as long as there’s been both – and suburbs emerged along with the first cities. 
There’s an interesting discussion on this theme happening (almost) locally.
It begins with a review in Seattle’s Stranger by Matthew Stadler.  He critiques and comments on two books: Sprawl by Robert Bruegmann, and Cities Without Cities by Thomas Sieverts. 
Start by reading Matthew’s article – Losing You Might be the Best Thing Yet: What has become of citiesHere’s a quote:

… the virtues we’ve long called urban (including, increasingly, density) now reside [in the ‘in-between’ suburbs], having fled the center long ago.
The pattern is even more pronounced in Vancouver, BC, San Francisco, and Los Angeles—larger, denser cities where the margins have become home to a globally mobile population whose patterns of settlement contradict our deepest myths about the city. No more the crowded, polyglot center surrounded by white-bread suburbs: Now the world spreads out across a patchwork landscape.

Then check out Clark Derry-Williams response – City Slickers – in the Sightline Institute’s Daily Score blog.  Here’s Clark:

Stadler lays out his thesis quite nicely here.  He’s a skilled and smooth writer, and while it would be easy to caricature his perspective as reflexively anti-city (or, really, anti-urban elite), that’s a mistake. 
He’s making a more subtle point:  the old idea that “city” and “suburb” are separate and distinct entities — either physically or culturally — no longer holds water.  He finds common intellectual ground with a German architect and planner, Thomas Sieverts (more here), who rejects the urban-suburban-exurban distinction in favor of the notion of the “in-between city,” a single entity that encompasses the entire built environment in all its permutations.
Ok, that’s fine — as far as it goes.  Obviously, the political boundaries separating “city” from “suburb” are arbitrary, and perhaps not all that helpful in understanding an ever-changing metropolis.
But the unsettling thing about Stadler’s writing is that — as far as I can tell — some of his facts are simply wrong.

Stadler and others respond.  It’s good stuff for urban policy wonks.  
Maybe we should get both of ’em up here for a little more debate.
 

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