Bob Ransford posted this:

When the Canada Line was being planned more than 15 years ago, the public was shown ridership models that said 70 percent of the ridership would be in the portion of the corridor between Waterfront Station and Oakridge Station.

Reality today is crush loads during rush hour from Richmond Brighouse all the way to Waterfront with lines at many Vancouver stations where crush-filled trains can’t accept more riders and near full loads at all hours just within Richmond alone. They got it wrong.

Transit drives housing development. So much for empty condos. Empty condos don’t drive this kind of heavy ridership.

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In planning for growth, there’s at least one generally agreed-on idea that most cities are trying out: Densifying along the major streets.  The arterials, boulevards and avenues, the wider ones, where the streetcars went, where transit does now.

Portland has a lot of them, radiating out from the river and downtown.  Here’s one of those streets – Division.  As you’d expect, it bisects the 19th-century suburbs:

 

Once it was a streetcar route, with a mix of bungalow housing and one-or two-storey commercial frontage – surprisingly narrow for a major corridor of activity.  It went into decline as Motordom prevailed, and became heavily auto-oriented.  Division, it was said, was where you went to get your car repaired.

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From The Vancouver Glass:

CREEKSIDE PARK— As a bike theft epidemic washes over the city, solutions to the problem are few and far between. It might seem like a radical response to the issue but legalizing recreational bike theft could help. Demonstrators are hoping to convince people it’s worth a try. They are calling for an end to the failed “War On Bikes”. It’s their belief that prohibition on bike theft has done more harm than good and it’s now time to try something different.

Full article continued here.

(It’s satire, folks) 

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Metro Vancouver has committed to ensuring our regional infrastructure, ecosystems, and communities are resilient to impacts of climate change, and to pursuing a regional target of 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. The Climate 2050 Strategic Framework will guide Metro Vancouver’s policies and collective actions to transition to a resilient, low carbon future – increasing the health, well-being and prosperity of our region.

Join us as to hear about next steps for developing Metro Vancouver’s Climate 2050 Roadmaps, and how local government and health authorities’ actions are already helping to create a resilient region.

  • Jason Emmert, Air Quality Planner, Metro Vancouver
  • Tamsin Mills, Senior Sustainability Specialist, City of Vancouver
  • Angie Woo, Climate Resilience & Adaptation Lead, Fraser Health Authority

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This little Brutalist building at Georgia and Cardero is already gone.

There were a few of these overbuilt blocks (really, three storeys in concrete?) scattered around the city and suburbs, typical of the 1970s.  Was there an architectural firm that specialized in them?  Were there economic reasons for their popularity?  Inquiring minds want to know if someone has answers.

The reason for their demolition is obvious, however.  This is what’s under construction now:

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In this second part, Tim Davis takes a look at how Amsterdam priorizes pedestrians.  (I’ve left the emphases intact to capture some of Davis Speak.) 

 

For those who think that Amsterdam prioritizes cyclists over pedestrians, the *opposite* is true. In fact, the very center of Amsterdam is so dense (especially in summer, when these were taken) that NO ONE bikes.

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Well, in this case, the 1960s are coming down.

Nineteen sixty-one, to be specific – when Royal Towers was built as a hotel across the street from New Westminster City Hall. Now the aldermen, as they were known then, had a place to get a beer before and/or after council meetings. They probably drove over, given that the place was obviously designed for the car:

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