Architecture
February 20, 2019

Daily Scot: Is mandatory parking in the West End just a big expensive hole?

By Scot Bathgate:

Vancouver has gone to great lengths to develop a vibrant pedestrian and bicycle friendly downtown core with abundant transit options for commuters and residents alike.  Those priorities have been so successful that the number of cars traveling into the downtown core is the same as it was in the 1960s.  In addition, we see all around the city centre the removal of large parking structures once vital to accommodating the flood of single occupancy drivers commuting into the city are coming down.

With such a successful planning approach, why is the City sabotaging this ethos by continuing to demand private parking spaces for residential development in downtown Vancouver’s largest neighbourhood, the West End?

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The drumbeat is getting louder.

From The New Yorker:

Uber’s most significant contribution to mobility in cities may be our increasing lack of it. …

… (Ridehailing companies like Uber) create immediate declines in bus and rail ridership—declines so steep that, in the next eight years, some transit agencies would have to increase service by more than twenty-five per cent just to retain their normal ridership. Cities struggling to keep subways and buses running are being drained of revenue by tech companies and a reserve army of cars.

These cars, in turn, coagulate the arteries of the city, blocking the remaining fleet of buses, causing a downward spiral of decreasing ridership and growing traffic. …

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Philanthropy is a critically important part of Canadian life.  However, the 2018 Giving Report finds that the current model of philanthropy in Canada is unsustainable. Why is it that philanthropic donations by individuals and families have been in decline since 2006? Does rising income inequality and wealth concentration among older Canadians mean that younger generations have less to give? How can we ensure that charitable organizations remain properly funded and can continue to provide vital support?

To start the conversation, we welcome Calvin Fong, the Vancouver Foundation’s Director of Donor Services; David Love, President of the Vancouver chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals and Principal of LOVEfundraising, and Jeanette Ageson, Publisher of the online newspaper The Tyee.  Then it’s your turn to ask questions, make observations and express opinions. It’s lunchtime, so please feel free to bring your lunch.

 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21

12:30 – 1:30 PM

FREE EVENT Registration is Required

SFU Vancouver at Harbour Centre, Room 1415
515 West Hastings St.

 

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From Michael Alexander:

First sunny day above freezing, and the newish playground next to Science World is packed as usual, with long lines for every ride including the zip line.

If the city charged $1 a kid (“C’mon Mom, it’s only a loonie!), in a year we could build enough affordable housing to meet demand*.

 

 

* Ed – First rule of affordable housing: demand is never met.

 

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Digital Democracy 101:
Understanding the Attention Economy

MONDAY, MARCH 4 | 6:00 – 7:30 PM
FREE EVENT Registration is Required
SFU Vancouver at Harbour Centre, Room 1400
515 West Hastings St.

Many Canadians actively use digital platforms without fully understanding the technology behind them and, crucially, how new technologies are altering Canadian political culture. The competition for our time and attention by digital platforms, which can often skew what we see and from whom, may leave us without the trusted information we need to make a confident decision in an election.

In this free lecture, Carl Miller, Research Director at Demos, will explain how the ‘attention economy’ can harm democracy. Following the lecture, Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, SFU’s Canada 150 Research Chair in New Media in the School of Communication, will join Miller in conversation before moderating an audience Q&A.

Register Today

 

The Rise of the Misinformation Society

TUESDAY, MARCH 5 | 7:00 PM
FREE EVENT Registration is Required
SFU Vancouver at Harbour Centre, Room 2245
515 West Hastings St.

From Facebook’s unaccountable monopoly power to the demise of reliable journalism, a misinformation ecosystem has taken root. This is particularly true in the United States where entire regions and issues lack media coverage at a time when robust reporting is desperately needed. These growing “news deserts” are disproportionately harming specific groups and areas, especially communities of color, rural districts, and lower socio-economic neighborhoods.

Join SFU’s School of Communication for the Dallas Smythe Memorial Lecture Series with Dr. Victor Pickard and engage in conversations about the ongoing collapse of commercial journalism and the policies necessary for establishing public alternatives.

Reserve Your Seat Read more »
February 14, 2019

Lost Lagoon after a few days of freezing weather.

So what do the ice patterns tell us?  Where the underwater currents flow, producing a frozen map of streams and ponds?  Temperature gradients? Or something else – if we have eyes to see.

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The Third Annual Bell Urban Forum

 

Vancouverism in a World of Cities

 

Nearly twenty years ago, ‘Vancouverism’ began to circulate as an internationally-recognized label for a distinctive set of practices of building, representing, and marketing the virtues of urban life. From planning, development, and architecture to cinema, transnational social movements, and increasingly cosmopolitan currents of migration, the Vancouver city-region has become a reference point for new configurations of density, diversity, and new relations between humans and the natural world.

At the same time, Vancouver has become the second or third most expensive housing market on the planet, and it’s all built on the unceded indigenous lands and communities that long predate British North America and Canada. Vancouver provides a unique vantage point from which to view the transformations of space and time — of past, present, and future — in an urban world.

Where have concepts of Vancouverism traveled? How have the images and narratives of Vancouverism evolved? How have these trends co-evolved with changes in the material lived realities of society and nature in the Vancouver region?

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Dianna has been eavesdropping:

Overheard yesterday on the bus. A millennial quite serious and slightly horrified: “Oh, no! I couldn’t go to an English-speaking veterinarian. My cat only speaks French.”

When we got off the bus in the pouring snow we were greeted by a total stranger with a cheery Merry Christmas!

And cycling the seawall:

Department of Good News/Bad News. A few weeks ago as I biked alongside the bank of daffodils on English Bay, I told them that they were too optimistic. It was too early to bloom. They didn’t listen, and so this… which makes the geese happy.

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