Scot writes:

A friend gifted me a beautiful replica 1928 map of ‘Greater’ Vancouver (just before the amalgamation of Vancouver, South Vancouver and Point Grey in 1929).

 

Upon further examination there are some neighbourhoods listed that I’ve never heard of, or perhaps have been renamed.

Rosedale – Renfrew & Grandview Highway:

Riverview – Victoria Drive & 59th:

Magee – West Blvd & 52nd:

In addition they are showing a neighbourhood called Strathcona located just south of King Edward west of Granville street

Any insight, PT historians?

Comments

  1. Magee High School is at 49th and Maple (near West Blvd), so that’s probably where the school name comes from.

  2. WRT Rosedale, much of the area between Rupert and Boundary south of Grandview was redeveloped post-WWII with the Renfrew Heights Housing Project for War Veterans. If you look at an aerial photo on Google, you’ll see that the grid pattern has been replotted from the map you posted.

    Chances are that the Renfrew Heights name took over from the Rosedale name.

  3. I have a book called “Vancouver A Visual History” by Bruce MacDonald. (https://www.amazon.ca/Vancouver-Visual-History-Bruce-Macdonald/dp/0889223114). It has maps of the city for every decade from 1860 through 1980, and the 1920/1930 maps have some very significant differences with the map you’ve shown. For example, your map shows a developed street grid in what’s now the “Champlain” area in the southeast corner of the city, while Bruce MacDonald’s book only very sparse street coverage with “Minto Park Site” and “Cromwell Park Site” adjacent to boundary road near 49th Ave and Arbor Ave, respectively. Your map also shows a street grid throughout the university endowment lands which obviously never happened. So I’m thinking that at least parts of your map are speculative, with the naming perhaps equally so.

  4. To add another one to the mix, there should be a Beaconsfield neighbourhood. Now it’s just the Western part of Renfrew-Collingwood. Historically it was the area around the Beaconsfield station of the Interurban that went to New West. Part of this area has been re-branded as Norquay Village by the city. You will notice that in this area, there is a Beaconsfield Park, a Beaconsfield School, and the church that is located near where I live was once known as Beaconsfield United. I believe the area was named after the 1st Earl of Beaconsfield aka Benjamin Disraeli.

  5. I notice where I live, 8th at VIctoria, is labelled Grandview without the current Woodlands appendage. Let’s turn back the clock please. When I tell someone I live in Grandview Woodlands I always feel like I am spouting a marketing description followed by an afterthought.

  6. I’ve concluded that the naming of the neighbourhoods as Magee, Riverview and Rosedale was likely an invention of the Vancouver Map and Blueprint Company Limited. It was located at 441 Seymour Street and here is a link to a photo where the maps were made:
    https://searcharchives.vancouver.ca/interior-of-vancouver-map-and-blueprint-company-limited-at-441-seymour-street

    The Vancouver Map & Blue Print Company, Ltd. was a Vancouver-based company that provided mapping and reproduction services for the architecture, engineering and construction industries. It’s titled as a commercial map so I suspect it was made for the real estate and development community. So the names may well have been a ‘realtor’ invention that did not stick.

    I checked 50 plus maps on-line in the Archives and searched the Bartholomew Plan and found no mention of those neighbourhoods. It’s interesting that the primary focus of the Vancouver Plan was actually transportation with land use and zoning appearing for a modest number of pages after page 200.

    One final note…it’s interesting that the centre of the map with concentric distance rings is from Main and Hastings. Apparently, that intersection was the only ‘Grand Junction’ in the entire streetcar and inter-urban network…ie a street car could turn in all four directions. (at least that’s the comment from a motorman narrating an 8 mm film from the early 50’s before the system was shut down)

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