There’s an absolute feast of great speakers on webinars right now.

Courtesy of the School of Cities at the University of Toronto hear well known planner and author Ken Greenberg talk with Melinda Yogendran and Matti Siemiatycki  
“Towards a New Kind of City-A conversation on resilience and adaptation with Ken Greenberg”

Join new grad Melinda Yogendran and SofC’s Interim Director Matti Siemiatycki as they speak with Ken Greenberg about adopting new practices for building better, more equitable cities.

This Spring, Ken Greenberg was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Laws from the University of Toronto. With convocations cancelled, he published his passionate convocation speech, illustrating a message of hope for new graduates to seize the baton and use this crisis to move us to a better place.

If you would like to submit a question for Ken Greenberg in advance, you can do that here.

Speakers:

Ken Greenberg, Principal, Greenberg Consultants Inc.

Melinda Yogendran, Recent Graduate of the Master’s of Planning program, University of Toronto

Matti Siemiatycki, Associate Professor and Interim Director, School of Cities, University of Toronto

Time
Thursday May 28, 2020 9:00 a.m. Pacific Time

To register, click on this link.

Image: TheStar

Comments

  1. Ken Greenberg is one of the world’s foremost urban designers. His background includes architecture, not just planning, which is often too broadstroke and/or myopic in vision. HIs book ” Walking Home” is a must read, in part because he writes in a style that avoids slogans, buzzwords from academia and plannese.

    He and Jan Gehl offer the world a tremendous bargain — and I say a little hesitantly, textbook* — solution to designing cities for humans. Between them and perhaps Peter Calthorpe, we have a pretty complete list of objectives for 21st Century sustainable urbanism. I note them because they all have both the philosophical direction nailed down AND years of nuts & bolts expertise in actual detailed design on the ground and founded in their architectural practices.

    * Some urban design publications are far too prescriptive, biased or academic in a paint-by-numbers “Seven Steps…” way.

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