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Located on the southeast corner of the 200  block of West Tenth Avenue and nestled in salal bushes, the enameltec sign that provides a historical interpretation is missing. There were several historic plaques placed in granite sets along West Tenth Avenue. In this case, there is also a bench which has not been taken.

You can take a look a this geocache site which shows a photo of the plaque for Dad’s Cookies, which is still outside 398 West Tenth. That plaque remembers the small bakery at Broadway and Yukon that had as its base an innovative cookie recipe.

Who remembers what was on this missing plaque, and when will it be replaced?

 

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Comments

  1. They lasted a surprisingly long time. Designed and produced when we still did paste up and blue pencil mark up on final art work… time for an updated design maybe, still have the fern frond drawing in my sketch book.

  2. 🙂 I’ve spotted it many times, including pointing it out when I have been conducting walking tours..thanks Sandy!

  3. It’s been missing a few years – I noticed its absence about two years ago and was told by my neighbours it was long gone before that. It used to note the beveled brick street surface that comprised the 2500-block Alberta for many years until it was removed for the BC Hydro duct bank install and never replaced. The bricks were removed on pallets for storage, supposedly at the East 47th works yard, but nothing has been seen of them since they were moved in 2012. Periodically I email the city streets division to see if there are any plans afoot to restore the brick street in accord with hits heritage streets policy (one of 9 heritage surfaces in the original list) but I don’t even get replies any more, now that senior planners and engineers I once had on my email list are long retired.

    Sigh. And now there’s even less reason for the City to keep the original granite curbs at the corners, which are also disappearing. the ones at 11th & Columbia, another Granitoid™ historic surface that was partly destroyed with poorly done maintenance.

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