Indigenous.  And primarily west of Alma.

 

It was Mike Harcourt’s observation: most of the new residential development in this city, potentially in the tens of thousands of units (at least for the next several decades), will be on reserve lands of the Squamish and Musqueam, or on lands sold to a joint entity like the MST Development Corp and partnered with Canada Lands or others.

The sites with greatest potential are, at the moment, Jericho East and West – but when the lease on the University Golf Course expires, that site will dwarf all the others.

Here’s the list of current or potential sites, marked with stars on the map above, from west to east:

  • Lelem
  • University Golf Course
  • Jericho West
  • Jericho East
  • Squamish reserve lands, south Burrard Bridge
  • Heather Lands
  • Former Liquor Distribution Branch site
  • Musqueam reserve lands, also subject to leases

Only reserve lands are not subject to city regulation; the acquired sites, like Jericho, proceed largely as though private-sector development.  But, of course, they’re not – at least in the sense that they’re seen to be part of the reconciliation process.

And in a city where even a single apartment block (see posts below) is treated by some as the first step in the ghettoization of Vancouver, others will welcome the opportunity to address housing issues under the cover of settler obligations to First Nations.

 

 

Comments

  1. You can not expect the public to use the same gibberish language used by planners, developers, and the “stuff more in” gang. Clearly local 30 year residents do know a thing or two and do have vested interests in their home place reality which deserves respect.

    So the question remains, who will live in this proposed building? And, secondly why should this project be either rejected or welcomed into this neighbourhood? Such a narrative can go a long way in keeping the peace.

  2. You can not expect the public to use the same gibberish language used by planners, developers, and the “stuff more in” gang. Clearly local 30 year residents do know a thing or two and do have vested interests in their home place reality which deserves respect. Listen.

    So the question remains, who will live in this proposed building? And, secondly why should this project be either rejected or welcomed into this neighbourhood? Such a narrative can go a long way in keeping the peace.

    1. I would expect the conversation should be based on the people without a home should have priority over the people that already do. That is just basic common decency.

  3. As a regular reader and contributor to PT, I can’t believe you actually wrote the above two paragraphs.

  4. Very excited to see my fellow Indigenous peoples building up their own economies through development. That money will flow back into the Squamish community and surrounding areas.

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