Design. Density. Delight. There’s so much going on in the many photos taken by editor-in-chief Gordon Price on his trip, which is, if you haven’t noticed by now, very much a working/thinking holiday.

As to what it all means…Gordon posits and proposes, and it makes you wonder along with him what makes Tokyo tick. How did they get a lot of things right, while also making so much of it beautiful?

Maybe you have some answers. Follow him on Instagram and engage. Your thoughts and ideas are always welcome; and as always, the pics below are just a sampling of what he’s posting.

The show gives an exhaustive number of examples, including this one.

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And then this. In three words: wash your hands.

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Now there are green rivers flowing through the city.

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For the women-only car on the F train, line up here.

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This is one of the most significant buildings ever built in Tokyo that no longer exists. And not because it was destroyed in an earthquake. Indeed, part of its fame is that it survived the devastating earthquake of 1923 (and the bombings of WW2). This was Frank Lloyd Wright’s Imperial Hotel, meant to serve and reflect western taste as a showcase of Japan modernity. And for that reason it was torn down in 1967 to be replaced by a modernist highrise that made more economic sense (see adjacent pics). Today the FLW Imperial would be a must-see attraction. Its loss was the Tokyo equivalent of the demolition of Pennsylvania Station in New York in 1963 – a neoclassical landmark greater in its way than Grand Central. Two acts of architectural vandalism.

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Thirty-foot forms. “Magic for my eyes,” says Michael.

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Comments

  1. The vertical signage that goes along with those 30-foot street frontages is one of the most beautiful useful things I know, especially at night.

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